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Lidded basket

Men wove baskets associated with power. This basket could have been used to hold divination pieces and valued possessions. The basket has four tiers, which might reflect cosmological beliefs associated with the stepped tier of rocks built on the graves of Kongo kings.

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Lidded basket

Acquired by Thistleton Dyer, 1880. Vegetable Substance Register, C1880/2387 notes “East India Museum” as source and adds “Palmyra palm”.

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Lidded basket

Acquired by Thistleton Dyer, 1880. Vegetable Substance Register, C1880/2388 notes “East India Museum” as source and adds “Palmyra palm”.

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Dance club

Makira Bay is in Arosi at the west end of Makira. The style of carving is Makira, but the exact purpose of the baton is unclear. If aqcuired with the fishing float 142/1992, then it may have been made for export.

Religion and magic

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Tunic

When a high status person died their village would pay respects by enacting a dramatic mourning ritual. The focus of the ritual was the chief mourner, wearing a costume called heva tupapa’u. Accompanied by armed and painted attendants they would appear at dawn or dusk and terrify the villagers for day after day. During this period the chief mourner was allowed to take violent revenge on anyone who had offended the dead person. People defying them could be injured or even killed unless they managed to escape. The women of the village played their part in the ritual by weeping, cutting themselves and soaking pieces of the funerary shroud in their blood and tears. When the villagers felt the time was right they would remove the mourner’s costume and destroy it. Surviving costumes are very rare and were sometimes given as prestigious gifts.

Clothing and accessories

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